St. Simon’s Island, Georgia – on my mind…

Well, it’s the end of the month, and I’ve been busy relaxing and procrasti-writing on St. Simon’s, not thinking about my blog, so here’s a little photo essay – truly, this is the most relaxing place I’ve ever been. Love it!

channeling my inner monkey

channeling my inner monkey

tree spirit

tree spirit

lawn art

lawn art

Pelican Pete on the Pier

Pelican Pete on the Pier

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Jekyll Island

Jekyll Island

uncommon friends

uncommon friends

Easter goodies, Georgia style (no problem filling the pews in the churches here, unlike in NS)

Easter goodies, Georgia style (no problem filling the pews in the churches here, unlike in NS)

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ready-made business for Don, in case we decide to stay…

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Most people here have a dog; some (lucky) people have a pig.

Most people here have a dog; some (lucky) people have a pig.

sunrise...

sunrise…

and sunset.

and sunset.

FAMILY PHOTOS – BEST-BEFORE DATES?

Mum, Nance and me 1962

Mum, Nance and me 1962

So I spent most of Sunday going through old family photos, and I do mean old. My grandmother as a girl in the early 1900s, my parents as children in the 1930s/40s, and of course, my own sweet self as a toddler in the early 60s. nance and meI’m happy to say I was ruthless in choosing what to keep, what to chuck, but I still came close to filling a 300-picture album! That’s my dad and his dad, Gramps Mingo, in the header (our two dogs are also in the picture but cropped out by WordPress).

So many of the ones I kept have meaning only for me; my kids barely knew any of their great grandparents, and my parents died when my kids were still pretty young. But it was a cozy way to spend a spring-like February afternoon. I love seeing the adults from my childhood as kids, and looking at the pictures reminds me that I’ve always been loved – lucky me!

Nana and Gramps Pearson

Nana and Gramps Pearson

Nana and Gramps Mingo

Nana and Gramps Mingo, 1956

One thing I like about old pictures is seeing the familiar (but fading from memory) places I spent time/lived as a kid – things like the (now retro) kitchen curtains, furniture we had forever, backyards, swing-sets, animals, dolls, etc., including Polly, the beloved “chocolate” baby I requested the Christmas I was two (my dad wrote the letter to Santa for me, and it was included (and saved) in today’s treasure trove/purge).

Last Christmas, we scanned a couple of hundred pictures of our kids and put them on USBs for each of them, although, of course, we kept all the actual photos, too. I have a big closet shelf heaped with photographs, some in albums, lots in boxes, envelopes, all randomly organized. They’re precious to me, but I suppose they must have an expiry date – I’m hopeful a few might make their way into the hands of future generations (if my kids decide to have kids, that is).

Nance, Mum and me

Nance, Mum and me

How do you deal with photos (pre-digital, that is)? Got a few favourites?

frosty words to warm your heart

IMG_3124So, I feel like I have to write at least one blog post every month, even when I have nothing to say (which is most of the time). Since we had our third major (and beautiful) snowfall yesterday, this morning I started reading some winter poems, including these. I wonder what Robert Frost would think if he could have known that so many school kids over the years (like me) would be committing his oh-so-familiar words to memory. And that’s a random frosty puppy picture of Charlie in 2012:)

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Wandering and Wondering through 2015

As I’ve been sitting around eating chocolates, drinking coffee and enjoying having both kids home for the holidays, I’ve also been reflecting on 2015, a busy year for me, especially in terms of writing. I did lots of wandering (14 trips by air, thousands of kilometers – a few too many, I think – Cuba, Georgia, Vancouver, Surrey, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Toronto, Maine, Ottawa, etc.) and plenty of wondering, marveling at sights I saw, things I heard. I met hundreds of readers, and lots of writers, too, including Alice Priestley, the illustrator of my first book, Rainbows in the Dark (2005).

In May, one of my favorite moments was seeing the mountains in British Columbia, a glorious sight I hadn’t seen since 1981. Stunningly beautiful! P1000544Another favorite, as part of TD Book Week, was arriving at a Sikh private school, donning a bright orange headscarf (which clashed with my pink shirt), before being greeted enthusiastically by a hundred smiling five and six-year-olds, several asking if I really had written If Dogs Could Talk, one of my books with Caramel Tree Readers. So sweet.

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With fellow juror (and new friend:) Rachna Gilmore.

In  December, I had dinner at the Governor General’s house, Rideau Hall, in Ottawa, and got to enjoy the company of many of Canada’s literary luminaries, briefly. In the lead-up to that Literary Awards ceremony, as part of the jury (with David Poulsen and Rachna Gilmore), I had the privilege of reading 148 Canadian novels published for young readers in 2014/15. There’s a lot of talent in our midst!

My newest book, The King of Keji, came out from Nimbus in June, I wrote (and read) pretty much every day all year, and saw my first (and possibly last) coy-wolf while loving being artist in residence at Fool’s Paradise, former home of Canadian artist, Doris McCarthy, overlooking the Scarborough Bluffs.

Fool's Paradise - a perfect reflection.

Fool’s Paradise – a perfect reflection.

2016 looks like it will be a less busy year, but before 2017 arrives, I’m hopeful of finding homes for the two novels I think I’ve finally finished polishing (possibly, maybe, hopefully…). And, of course, lots of new ideas to start getting down on paper. Also, Sky Pig (with intricate plasticine illustrations by Suzanne Del Rizzo) 9781927485989 (2)will fly out from Pajama Press in April, 2016.

Sincere thanks to YOU for being part of my year; I hope your 2016 will be pleasantly busy, full of good health and cozy time spent with those who matter most to you. Take good care of yourself, and I hope to see you again next year!

Propping up a saggy middle – writer-style…

Yeah, so this isn’t about support hose, girdles or Spanx. I’ve been reading up on plotting and pacing, trying to figure out how to move things along more efficiently in my writing (ie. get rid of the boring parts). If I had a choice, I’d take character development over plotting any day. Sadly, there is no such choice as both are essential elements. So, here’s the list I keep taped to my desk:images

PLOTTING ADVICE – INCREASING TENSION IN YOUR NOVEL

  • COMPLICATE THINGS; ADD APPREHENSION
  • THINK OF CHARACTERS AS ACTORS ON STAGE – IS WHAT THEY’RE DOING CAPTIVATING?
  • RAISE INTERESTING QUESTIONS, CAUSING READERS TO WANT ANSWERS
  • BUILDING TENSION IS LIKE INFLATING A BALLOON, SLOWLY BUT SURELY, UNTIL IT THREATENS TO POP
  • FORESHADOWING
  • PRUNE SCENES DOWN TO THE ESSENTIAL BITS
  • ANTICIPATION (OF GOOD AND BAD THINGS); POSTPONE THE RESOLUTION
  • INCLUDE MORE PROMISES TO SET UP THE READER’S EXPECTATIONS
  • DON’T MAKE EVERYBODY TOO NICE (yikes!)
  • THINK OF FLAWS THAT CAUSE CONFLICT/OBSTACLES TO GOAL
  • FLUCTUATING EMOTION
  • CHANGES TO THROW THE PROTAGONIST OFF BALANCE
  • WHAT IS THE PROTAGONIST’S (OR YOUR READER’S) WORST FEAR?
  • UNEXPECTED TWISTS – OPPOSITE OF WHAT’S EXPECTED
  • LET YOUR PROTAGONIST HAVE SECRETS SHE KEEPS
  • ANGER/HURT BETWEEN CHARACTERS
  • BAD STUFF THAT HAPPENS QUICKLY
  • GO THERE – LET YOUR PROTAGONIST HIT ROCK BOTTOM
  • ALWAYS GIVE THE READER A REASON TO TURN THE PAGE (ESPECIALLY AT CHAPTER ENDINGS)

I read a lot of articles, but many of these ideas came from C.S. Laskin’s site, a valuable resource for writers, found here: Picture1 http://www.livewritethrive.com/resources/ Thank you!

I hope you might find some of these ideas useful. It would be easier if we could just buy Spanx for our words – I suppose that’s one of the editor’s roles:) And if all else fails, read your work aloud to your dog, my best audience. Thanks for reading, and happy plotting!

Read 148 Novels in 4.5 months? Yup.

FINALLY, the winners of the 2015 Governor General’s Literary Awards were announced today. Huge congratulations to Caroline Pignat, who won her second GG for her beautiful book, The Gospel Truth. 2015_text-e_PignatAlong with Rachna Gilmore and David Poulsen, I had the privilege of being on the peer assessment committee for the Children’s Literature (Text) Award this year. As part of that task, we each read the 148 novels submitted for consideration – all between mid-April and the end of August. More than one book a day, and many were 300+ pages. What an incredible (and somewhat intimidating) learning experience!

Never having done this before, I had no idea how I would go about choosing from such a fine collection of books. But as I read, certain books simply emerged; their characters, stories and words all stayed with me long after I’d finished reading. I went to our Ottawa meeting in early September naively believing it would take only a couple of hours for the three of us to discuss the short-listed books and come to a consensus re the five finalists and one winner.

I was wrong.

It was more like ten hours of intense discussion and debate that left both my brain and body exhausted, but I think we all left the room feeling like we’d done a good job. We also collaborated on this brief, yet hard-to-write, jury statement:

Caroline Pignat’s The Gospel Truth is the powerful and poignant story of 16-year-old Phoebe, a slave girl in 1858 Virginia. Written in lyrical and elegant free verse, it is an unflinching look at the brutality of slavery and Phoebe’s struggle for freedom and truth. Ultimately, this is a story of hope.

We weren’t allocated sufficient words to mention that the story is told in six different voices. The other four finalists, all of them excellent books, are Young Man With Camera (Emil Sher), 2015_text-e_SherWe Are All Made of Molecules (Susin Nielsen), 2015_text-e_NielsenAre You Seeing Me? (Darren Groth), 2015_text-e_Grothand Audrey (Cow) (Dan Bar-el). 2015_text-e_Bar-elCongratulations to one and all. There sure are a lot of amazing children’s authors writing brilliant, diverse books in Canada today. Happy reading!

Libraries, Old and New; WOTS

One of the (increasingly) few memories I have from my pre-school life is of waiting for my fifth birthday so I could get my own library card. You had to be five, but you also had to be able to print your own name! img003The library in my hometown of Truro, Nova Scotia in 1965 was an old wooden structure, and the children’s department was at the very top of a very steep set of stairs – I remember the excitement of climbing those stairs, wondering what treasure I’d take home that day. Sadly, I couldn’t find an image of that library online, but this is my hometown (Wolfville, NS) library now, formerly the train station, back when we had trains! I’m a frequent visitor.

Wolfville Library

Last week, I finally got to see the new Halifax Central Library while I was there reading The King of Keji at The Word on the Street. It’s stunning, as you can see. halifax librarySo spacious and open inside with sweeping staircases, downloadcomfortable seating, very kid-friendly, there’s a coffee shop and you can even check out your books yourself by scanning your card and the book barcodes. Librarians are some of my favourite people (especially the fabulous women at the Wolfville Library!), and I feel like that social interaction is a huge part of the library experience for so many people; hopefully the scanning option won’t eliminate that for those who aren’t in a hurry.

And a shout-out to the MANY volunteers who organized and delivered an excellent Word on the Street experience for one and all at the Halifax Central Library last weekend. download (1)This was the first year WOTS was run entirely by volunteers, and it seemed very well thought-out and lots of people came out to show some love for local books, writers, booksellers (yay, Woozles!) and literacy. Thank you!

How’s your local library these days?